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Honey and Oral Health

Posted by Arqustany Putra Monday, August 31, 2009 0 comments




Honey is known to possess a variety of antioxidants and antibacterial substances that have been shown to inhibit growth of a wide range of bacteria and fungi. The antimicrobial properties of honey may render it beneficial in the treatment of various oral ailments including periodontal disease and mouth ulcers.

Select honeys demonstrate antimicrobial activity against oral pathogens,
Engeseth NH, Gheldof N, Wang X, Nickelsen JD, Husmillo G, Wu CD. Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activity of Honeys Against Oral Pathogens Journal of Dental Research. 2002;80:349. abstract- Paper presented at the International Association for Dental Research

The purpose of this study was to characterize the antioxidant content of honey from 10 different floral sources (sage, orange, tupelo, manuka, buckwheat, acacia, fireweed, clover, Hawaiian Christmasberry, and soy) and determine their effects on growth of selected oral pathogens (e.g., Steptococcus mutans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum). Antioxidant capacity of the honeys was determined via the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay. Specific antioxidant components including phenolics and ascorbate were determined via HPLC analysis. ORAC values ranged from 3 -17 mmol Trolox equivalent/g honey. A linear correlation was observed between total phenolic content and ORAC activity (R2= 0.9352). Antioxidant capacity of the honeys appeared to be due primarily to their phenolic composition as opposed to enzymatic antioxidants and ascorbic acid. Although all 10 honeys were not effective at inhibiting growth of S. mutans, selected components of honeys were active when tested individually (MIC values: 31.225 ?g/ml, abscisic acid; 1 mg/ml, coumaric acid and vanillic acid). Kaempferol was active against both S. mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. These results suggest that honeys from different floral sources may exhibit varied antimicrobial activities.

Manuka honey may aid in the treatment of gingivitis
English HK, Pack AR, Molan PC. The effects of manuka honey on plaque and gingivitis: a pilot study. Journal of the International Academy of Periodontology. 2004 Apr;6(2):63-7.

Studies have already shown that manuka honey with a high antibacterial activity is likely to be non-cariogenic. The current pilot study sought to determine if manuka honey with an antibacterial activity rated UMF 15 could be used to reduce dental plaque and clinical levels of gingivitis. A chewable manuka "honey leather" (similar to a stick of chewing gum) was produced for this pilot study. Thirty subjects were randomly provided the manuka honey product or sugarless chewing gum to chew or suck for 10 minutes, three times a day, after each meal. Plaque and gingival bleeding scores were recorded before and after the 21-day trial period. Those receiving the manuka honey product showed significant reductions in mean plaque scores (p=0.001) and the percentage of bleeding sites (p=0.001) while those receiving the chewing gum showed no significant changes in either plaque or gingival bleeding scores. These results suggest that there may be a potential therapeutic role for manuka honey confectionery in the treatment of gingivitis and periodontal disease.

The potential of honey to promote oral wellness
Molan PC The potential of honey to promote oral wellness. General Dentistry. 2001 Nov-2001 Dec 31; 49 (6):584-9

Honey has been used as a medicine since ancient times. Because of it’s antimicrobial properties, honey has the potential to combat oral pathogens and holds promise for the treatment of periodontal disease, mouth ulcers, and other diseases of the oral cavity. This review article describes the general therapeutic features of honey, examines the specific use of honey for oral health, and addresses the concern of potential cariogeneity of honey.

Dates - Rich in Proteins, Vitamins

Posted by Arqustany Putra Friday, August 28, 2009 0 comments



Muslims generally break their fast by eating dates. Prophet (Sallallaahu Alayhi Wasallam) is reported to have said, "If anyone of you is fasting, let him break his fast with dates. In case he does not have them, then with water. Verily water is a purifier."
The Prophet (Sallallaahu Alayhi Wasallam) used to break his fast by eating some dates before offering Maghrib Salaat, and if ripe dates were not available, he used to substitute them with some dried grapes. When they too were not available, he used to have a few sips of water, according to some reports. Modern science has proved that dates are part of a healthy diet. They contain sugar, fat and proteins, as well as important vitamins. Hence, the great importance attached to them by the Prophet.
Dates are also rich in natural fibres. Modern medicine has shown that they are effective in preventing abdominal cancer. They also surpass other fruits in the sheer variety of their constituents. They contain oil, calcium, sulphur, iron, potassium, phosphorous, manganese, copper and magnesium. In other words, one date satisfies the minimum requirements of a balanced and healthy diet. Arabs usually combine dates with milk and yoghurt or bread, butter and fish. This combination indeed makes a self-sufficient and tasty diet for both mind and body.
Dates and date palms have been mentioned in the Noble Qur'aan twenty times, thus showing their importance. The Prophet likened a good Muslim to the date palm, saying, "Among trees, there is a tree like a Muslim. Its leaves do not fall."
Dates are rich in several vitamins and minerals. When the level of trace elements falls in the body, the health of the blood vessels is affected leading to an increased heart-rate and a consequent inability to perform its function with normal efficiency. As dates are also rich in calcium, they help to strengthen the bones. When the calcium content in the body decreases, children are affected with rickets and the bones of adults become brittle and weak.
Dates are also important in keeping up the health of eyes. It is quite effective in guarding against night-blindness. In the early years of Islam, dates served as food for Muslim warriors. They used to carry them in special bags hung at their sides. They are the best stimulant for muscles and so the best food for a warrior about to engage in battle.
The Prophet (Sallallaahu Alayhi Wasallam) used to combine dates with bread sometimes. At other times he mixed ripe dates with cucumber, or dates combined with ghee. He used to take all varieties of dates, but he preferred the variety called Ajwah.

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